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Thread: Inauguration Day, Inauguration Hooooooraaay!

  1. #14441
    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    Oh my God. What does it say about American culture that we produce this sort of thing? This feels so wrong to me. I don't blame any of the individuals really, but what's wrong with our society that people do this?
    No idea. What about Asian culture? Has anybody figured out why they like Disney even more than we do? Or was your point not about fetishizing Disney characters so much as the other aspects of the dating site?

  2. #14442
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend Jones View Post
    No idea. What about Asian culture? Has anybody figured out why they like Disney even more than we do? Or was your point not about fetishizing Disney characters so much as the other aspects of the dating site?
    No idea either. I find Disney worship incomprehensible, so I'm not the person to ask why. I just have a gut feeling that there's something really off about it. Death of god or some ****.

  3. #14443
    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    Oh my God. What does it say about American culture that we produce this sort of thing? This feels so wrong to me. I don't blame any of the individuals really, but what's wrong with our society that people do this?
    To be fair, it is in Utah, so it's heightened.
    sniff

  4. #14444
    Admiral of Awesome
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    I donít care where you fall on the Huawei dispute, the fact that an American supply boycott can be so disruptive to a foreign interest (no less one that actually works to avoid exposure to that risk) should be extremely concerning to everybody not living in the United States.

  5. #14445
    Hmm, didn't we oppose all those pesky trade agreements because of those lawsuits foreign companies could file against countries pulling this ****? Does anyone know if America has one of those agreements with China?
    Sorry for the lousy German

  6. #14446
    Admiral of Awesome
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    Other than the WTO, I doubt it, but the US doesnít honor its treaty obligations so it wouldnít matter anyway.

  7. #14447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post
    The FAA is not capable of providing proper oversight due to American political preferences. The rest of the world should no longer recognize FAA type certifications.
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...eview-complete

    Well, hi there

  8. #14448
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post
    Government oversight is literally Stalinism and I will not back down from this true statement.

  9. #14449
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    Real talk though, does the U.S. really even regulate anymore? When was the last major antitrust suit? Microsoft?

  10. #14450
    Admiral of Awesome
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    No, itís great. If the government cracked down on corporations then you might lose your job, and then you couldnít afford to treat the rare cancers your employer gave you.

  11. #14451
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  12. #14452
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    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/03/us-c...s-tariffs.html

    Heh. Everyone agrees it's U.S. consumers paying for Trump's tariffs. And he wants to expand them to India. Y'all ready for prices on random **** to rise even more?

  13. #14453
    I mean, it's pretty obvious that tariffs are going to raise prices. Is it even surprising? But Making America Great Again is going to take sacrifice I suppose...
    "I would rather claim to be an uneducated man than be mal-educated and claim to be otherwise." - Wookie 03:16


  14. #14454
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie06 View Post
    I mean, it's pretty obvious that tariffs are going to raise prices. Is it even surprising? But Making America Great Again is going to take sacrifice I suppose...
    I'll take a recession for $500, Alex.

    It's not jeopardy, it's just you paying alot for a recession.

  15. #14455
    Are we in a recession? Seriously asking, I don't know. I have heard unemployment is at somewhat record lows but I don't pay much attention to unemployment rates as that game is rigged. I've just heard that there are good things in the economy but, again, I don't really pay attention to that stuff now so I really don't know. My general opinion has been for years now that this whole thing is a sham and a house of cards. I don't really hold any strong opinions about the current state.

    Speaking of Jeopardy, I heard some guy failed spectacularly to break the record recently.
    "I would rather claim to be an uneducated man than be mal-educated and claim to be otherwise." - Wookie 03:16


  16. #14456
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie06 View Post
    Are we in a recession? Seriously asking, I don't know. I have heard unemployment is at somewhat record lows but I don't pay much attention to unemployment rates as that game is rigged. I've just heard that there are good things in the economy but, again, I don't really pay attention to that stuff now so I really don't know. My general opinion has been for years now that this whole thing is a sham and a house of cards. I don't really hold any strong opinions about the current state.

    Speaking of Jeopardy, I heard some guy failed spectacularly to break the record recently.
    The wonks think one is likely if Trump doesn't pull back from his trade war.

  17. #14457


    Quote Originally Posted by Not The Onion
    That’s right. Hydrocarbons shall henceforth be known as “molecules of U.S. freedom.” Proud Americans are fracking compounds of liberty from the glorious shale beds of Texas and shipping it ‘round the world.

    Anyway, it gets better. The actual news here is that the Department of Energy gave Houston-based Freeport LNG approval to export gas processed at a new liquefaction plant that the company is set to build at a facility off the coast of Texas. Elsewhere in the government’s press release, U.S. Undersecretary of Energy Mark W. Menezes explains, “Increasing export capacity from the Freeport LNG project is critical to spreading freedom gas throughout the world by giving America’s allies a diverse and affordable source of clean energy.” (Bolds are mine.)

    Freedom gas. It appears that turn of phrase originated earlier this month, when Secretary of Energy Rick Perry signed an order aimed at doubling U.S. liquefied natural gas shipments to Europe. At a press briefing in Brussels, he explained that the move would help European nations diversify their energy supply away from Russia, the region’s major supplier of gas. “The United States is again delivering a form of freedom to the European continent,” he said. “And rather than in the form of young American soldiers, it’s in the form of liquefied natural gas.” Afterward, a cheeky reporter from EURACTIV asked whether “freedom gas” would be a correct way to describe the new fuel shipments. “I think you may be correct in your observation,” an apparently inspired Perry responded.
    https://slate.com/business/2019/05/f...of-energy.html

  18. #14458
    Admiral of Awesome
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    Huh, leave it to the US government to find a way to make "they hate us for our freedom" true

  19. #14459
    It's Stuart, Martha Stuart
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    Silly as that is, natural gas emits far less carbon per unit of energy generated compared to coal, which it is replacing. LNG plants are also much more flexible which makes them capable of accommodating wind and solar generation without wasting a bunch of fuel. LNG is absolutely a necessary step toward reducing carbon footprint, and all the people pitching a huge fit and demanding and end to fracking are exactly why environmentalism gets nowhere. The loudest voices are idiots who haven't bothered to educate themselves at all, and spend half their efforts shooting themselves in the foot, and the other half can mollified by lame policies that accomplish little beyond transferring tax dollars to corporate rent seekers who want to take advantage of the situation.

  20. #14460
    Also, FWIW, the monicker "freedom gas" has more to do with this whole "Iron Curtain" view, where the US is liberating Europe from Russian tyranny. (In this case, the idea seems to be to free Europe from needing to buy gas from Газпром).

    I just thought the name "freedom gas" sounds completely idiotic.

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    Last edited by Reverend Jones; 06-04-2019 at 02:42 PM.

  21. #14461
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    Taco Bell farts: freedom gas.

  22. #14462
    https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-r...soul-with-them

    Quote Originally Posted by Someone on a site not run by private equity

    Private equity markets killed radio. Radio stations were simply worth more to a large broadcasting company than a small local station because large broadcasters could leverage their massive advertising network.

    We're going to eventually look back and wonder how much damage the rise of private equity and modern finance has done to so many things that were once of such high quality. Financial engineering is distorting the original intent of market forces and leaving more and more consumers with an inferior product.
    https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=20132229

  23. #14463
    Amusingly, just as was listening to Big Star, I read the
    Quote Originally Posted by next comment down
    Even before private equity, it was very difficult for indie musicians to get their songs played on the air, due to collusion with the recording industry.

    [...]
    This is a little funny though as I think about the case of Big Star, a band which (I have read) was known because of their airplay, but whose record label apparently didn't know how to market the band, and most of their albums went straight to the bargain bin, and people couldn't find them on the shelves. It probably didn't help that Stax soon went bankrupt altogether....
    Last edited by Reverend Jones; 06-08-2019 at 09:53 PM.

  24. #14464
    Admiral of Awesome
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    Financial engineering is distorting the original intent of market forces and leaving more and more consumers with an inferior product.

    🤔

  25. #14465
    Of course, for the last couple decades at least, the airwaves have been dominated by Wookie's favorite entertainers:

    Quote Originally Posted by Some other guy
    Deregulation enabled Clear Channel to effectively monopolize terrestrial radio finance was the tool but without deregulation it would have been legally impossible.

  26. #14466
    I think you're forgetting that "market forces" actually means "magic forces".

  27. #14467
    Admiral of Awesome
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend Jones View Post
    I think you're forgetting that "market forces" actually means "magic forces".
    oh

  28. #14468
    Also, you guys should check out magicforce.com. Capitalism was made in JkEdit.

  29. #14469
    Admiral of Awesome
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    Mistakes from paying too much attention in Econ 101: Firms in capitalism donít compete against each other to provide the best value at the lowest price. Firms in capitalism compete against each other to provide the highest returns on investment. Goods market performance is an artifact of capital markets strategy, not vice-versa.

    Itís an easy mistake to make, because most people think capitalism and free market mean the same thing.

  30. #14470
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post
    Mistakes from paying too much attention in Econ 101: Firms in capitalism don’t compete against each other to provide the best value at the lowest price.
    Well duh, if you can offer the same (or better) product than your competitors for less than them, why would you charge anything but 1 cent less than them? Charging as little as possible without incentive to do so makes no fiscal sense.

  31. #14471
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    Well duh, if you can offer the same (or better) product than your competitors for less than them, why would you charge anything but 1 cent less than them? Charging as little as possible without incentive to do so makes no fiscal sense.
    Individually, they don't. Collectively, markets hill climb toward profitless production maximization. In the short term a business ends up pocketing the benefit from investment, but in the long term, as other companies make similar investments, the price approaches a new lower equilibrium and most/all of that benefit gets passed on to consumers. This is just what happens when you have a lot of people all making individually rational investment decisions and selling at the highest prices they can get.

    Unless, that is, their goal isn't to maximize profits, but instead to be good stocks. In which case TL;DR: MAD is a Nash equilibrium.

  32. #14472
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post
    Unless, that is, their goal isn't to maximize profits, but instead to be good stocks. In which case TL;DR: MAD is a Nash equilibrium.
    i.e.

    If you invest rationally to maximize your profits, everybody else will be forced to invest rationally, too. Even if your investment (technology) is better and you're ultimately going to win the game, your growth will at first explode (as you take a much larger market share) and then go negative (while you wait for inventories to deplete from the dearly departed). At the end you're in a stronger goods market position, a larger firm in a less competitive market, but your stock looks gross. You look like you're in an unstable market where large firms get routinely toppled.

    If you carefully manage your investments around what your competitors are doing, then everybody can show consistent growth with good profit. You aren't maximizing your profit, but your company looks stable and that means your stock is a good store of wealth (therefore more valuable and also more liquid). And if your minimal investments are M&A, then you get the benefits of a less competitive market without the capitalist crisis of trying to be competitive on goods markets.

  33. #14473
    it's insano crazy that so many people are doing mental backflips and contortions so they don't have to acknowledge that Iran was behind the attack on the fuel tankers. Jeeeeeeez.

  34. #14474
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    Gulf of Tonkin incident

  35. #14475
    Admiral of Awesome
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    I mean, I agree. Governments are super trustworthy and itís insano crazy to be even a little skeptical that they might lie

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/rcmp-...paign-1.188599
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rati...r_the_Iraq_War

  36. #14476
    Itís not at all unreasonable to be suspicious, especially with the current administration. Itís not as much the skepticism or the caution that is preposterously misguided, as much as the straight-up conspiratorial thinking that some are falling into in order to protect their priors, or, in other cases, ignorance of what Iran has been doing in the region combined with an overly charitable interpretation of Iranís intentions (which is required because orange man bad, Obama good, and, subsequently, JCPOA good, and then, and hereís the weird part, Iran good and Arab states bad).

  37. #14477
    Never mind that comparing this incident to the Gulf of Tonkin incident hardly works, as, according to Pompeo, this incident isnít being used as a justification for escalation ó especially not military escalation.

  38. #14478
    The comparisons to the lead up to the Iraq War are especially preposterous. And I say that even if it were true that everything up until this point with Trump and Iran were somehow completely fabricated. If that were the case, the extent of the similarity would go about as far as ďthe White House lied as a pretext to engage in an armed conflict in the Middle East.Ē

  39. #14479
    Quote Originally Posted by Eversor View Post
    Never mind that comparing this incident to the Gulf of Tonkin incident hardly works, as, according to Pompeo, this incident isnít being used as a justification for escalation ó especially not military escalation.
    also jim morrisons dad was in charge of the gulf of tonkin incident, but theyre both dead now. hard to make comparisons id say
    sniff

  40. #14480
    Itís a comparison that only intuitively makes sense because itís become collective wisdom in certain circles, not because it holds up to any degree of scrutiny at all.
    Last edited by Eversor; 06-14-2019 at 11:07 PM.

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