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Thread: Inauguration Day, Inauguration Hooooooraaay!

  1. #12881
    Nostalgia isn't based on whether the days were actually good or bad but I'm also pretty sure normally formed adults aren't thinking about Nazi Germany as the good old times.
    "I would rather claim to be an uneducated man than be mal-educated and claim to be otherwise." - Wookie 03:16


  2. #12882
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie06 View Post
    Nostalgia isn't based on whether the days were actually good or bad but I'm also pretty sure normally formed adults aren't thinking about Nazi Germany as the good old times.
    I think you're taking the whole thing a bit too seriously

  3. #12883
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie06 View Post
    Nostalgia isn't based on whether the days were actually good or bad but I'm also pretty sure normally formed adults aren't thinking about Nazi Germany as the good old times.
    Well, yeah, most CEOs from back then are dead.

  4. #12884
    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    I think you're taking the whole thing a bit too seriously
    I'll take that as a compliment, that I'm taking much of anything seriously, however if there's a tinge of sarcasm to your recent posts then that would explain a lot. And by recent I'm only talking about the two I noticed about voting and Fanta. Okay, I'll try to go away for a bit again.
    "I would rather claim to be an uneducated man than be mal-educated and claim to be otherwise." - Wookie 03:16


  5. #12885

  6. #12886
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend Jones View Post
    Iím sure they will care, they have principles havenít you heard?

  7. #12887
    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie06 View Post
    Nostalgia isn't based on whether the days were actually good or bad but I'm also pretty sure normally formed adults aren't thinking about Nazi Germany as the good old times.
    I've seen too many people who actually do. :-(

    Mind you, it's mostly old farts who are still not old enough to actually have lived back then but are old enough to have lived through the bad aftermath.
    Sorry for the lousy German

  8. #12888
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    Quote Originally Posted by Impi View Post
    I've seen too many people who actually do. :-(

    Mind you, it's mostly old farts who are still not old enough to actually have lived back then but are old enough to have lived through the bad aftermath.
    The political economics ďhair of the dogĒ
    Last edited by Jon`C; 11-20-2018 at 05:24 AM.

  9. #12889
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    Everything is bad now. Everything used to be better. This is because the way we used to do things was better, not because we are suffering the consequences of it today.

  10. #12890
    ALL GLORY TO THE CONTEST WINNER

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    lol i guess everyone hates the current brexit deal so much that a bunch of conservative MPs are resigning.
    It'd be shocking, the number of ministers she's lost in the last year, if any of them were in any way competent.

    They should probably bar anyone that went to public school from holding office.

  11. #12891
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    hey wot the f

  12. #12892
    Thought he was onto something.
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    Don't listen to him, saberopus, if you want to go into public office, you can do it.
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    enshu

  13. #12893
    ALL GLORY TO THE CONTEST WINNER

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    I should probably point out that "public school" in the UK means a private school because of stupid reasons.

    [It's a reference to the public schools act of 18whogivesatoss.]

  14. #12894
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    then I'll just say wot the f again at this new factoid

  15. #12895
    wait what? Public means private? Is this like how in America conservative means liberal?

  16. #12896
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend Jones View Post
    wait what? Public means private? Is this like how in America conservative means liberal?
    No. Itís because the schools were run by the public, rather than by the state. In North America theyíre called private schools because theyíre private property. Iím sure this says something about our respective cultures.

  17. #12897
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wookie06 View Post
    Nostalgia isn't based on whether the days were actually good or bad but I'm also pretty sure normally formed adults aren't thinking about Nazi Germany as the good old times.
    yeah they're mostly thinking about jim crow america
    If you think the waiters are rude, you should see the manager.

  18. #12898
    Because it just popped up and is a little bit relevant:

    "50 years ago everything was much better", Heinz typed on his new Galaxy S9 Plus smartphone.
    Sorry for the lousy German

  19. #12899
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    Watched Death of a Nation. Some moments are hilarious. Much of it is boring.

    I had the thought though, so much of what he expresses are true facts with no context. It's a stellar example of why being able to contextualize knowledge is as important as knowledge. When you grasp for straws with no context, any interpretation is possible.

    I'd recommend it for nobody but Wookie.

  20. #12900
    It's Stuart, Martha Stuart
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post

    Also, no, businesses are not being ďpushedĒ to pay employees more. Adjusted for inflation, wages have decreased 20% since 1990. Businesses are paying their workers less than ever. Economists have been reporting that despite full employment, US employers are not behaving like theyíre competing for workers. This is not how markets are supposed to work. Businesses are clearly colluding to suppress wages well below market rates.
    Adjust for inflation, US wages have increased very slightly since 1990.

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank...d-for-decades/

    However, rising health care costs probably account for some of the missing growth. I expect that a glut of labor worldwide has contributed to the increasing difficulty for lower skill first world laborers to continue to demand a vastly disproportionate amount of the world's resources for what is increasingly the exact same work.

  21. #12901
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post
    No. Itís because the schools were run by the public, rather than by the state. In North America theyíre called private schools because theyíre private property. Iím sure this says something about our respective cultures.
    It's stupider than that and, as always with Britain, it comes down to class.

    Public schools are public in that any member of the public can attend (provided they pay the fees). Prior to that schools had strict entry requirements based on faith or your parents needed to be gentry or members of a prestigious guild.

  22. #12902

  23. #12903
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obi_Kwiet View Post
    Adjust for inflation, US wages have increased very slightly since 1990.

    http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank...d-for-decades/
    Government provided inflation rates are based on the BLS monthly Consumer Price Index. You can read all about how BLS determines CPI here and make up your own mind about it: https://www.bls.gov/opub/hom/pdf/homch17.pdf

    The up-shot is, CPI isnít a magic black box that tells you the true value of inflation. Itís a flawed metric based on a carefully curated set of sample statistics, and in my opinion itís been gamed in the US for political advantage just like unemployment statistics are (U3). Pay extra attention to the parts about who is in their sample and what they intentionally exclude from the basket.

    These criticisms are super mainstream by the way. Iím not creative enough to invent my own criticisms of CPI. US government inflation statistics have been described as horse**** in publications as boring as Forbes and the Economist (although not in so few words). Even BLS acknowledges their methods are flawed.

    I expect that a glut of labor worldwide has contributed to the increasing difficulty for lower skill first world laborers to continue to demand a vastly disproportionate amount of the world's resources for what is increasingly the exact same work.
    Considering how many of these people live in run down ****hole towns I donít think itís credible to argue that thereís a glut of labor. Thereís clearly a lot of work to do that isnít being done. The problem is inefficient capital allocation, not excess people.

    But yes, there is no real reason an average American worker should make more money than someone equally skilled who lives in a different country.
    Last edited by Jon`C; 11-27-2018 at 03:53 PM.

  24. #12904

  25. #12905
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    If anybody wants a TL;DR, the official US inflation rate is based on the categorized expenses of urban wage earners.

    So, for example, if youíre a rural person who has seen food double in price over the last 5 years, that isnít included in inflation.

    Or if youíre an unemployed student who is paying 10 times the tuition that his parents paid, you are also not included in inflation.

    Or if youíre a retiree whose out of pocket healthcare expenses have skyrocketed, that also isnít included.

    But if youíre a software engineer in San Francisco, your expenses are considered. Not your house, though; thatís not consumption, itís an investment.

    Substitutions also arenít included. For example, if food prices double and you realize you canít afford to shop at Whole Foods anymore, so you go to Safeway instead. Youíre paying the same price you were before, but now itís for weird cleaner-flavoured Safeway produce instead of Whole Foods produce. Whatís the inflation rate on food? 0.

    The net result here is, the US inflation rate narrowly excludes all of the **** parts of the US economy. BLS insists that itís not doing it - at least, not on purpose. But itís all written right there in their own methodology guidebook.

    If you want to understand how much money Americans are being paid, what you really want is a CPI-adjusted discretionary income. This is the amount of consumption Americans have left after paying for all of the stuff theyíre pretty much forced to pay. Unfortunately, however, the United States government does not measure it.


    (Just in case anybody thinks Iím being too hard on the US here, let me give you some examples of what Canadian CPI excludes: food, energy, housing. They might as well use the ****ing Big Mac index.)

  26. #12906
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reid View Post
    Watched Death of a Nation. Some moments are hilarious. Much of it is boring.

    I had the thought though, so much of what he expresses are true facts with no context. It's a stellar example of why being able to contextualize knowledge is as important as knowledge. When you grasp for straws with no context, any interpretation is possible.

    I'd recommend it for nobody but Wookie.
    Also, I'm visible in one of the scenes in this documentary.

  27. #12907
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    Time to create an IMDB page, Reid.

  28. #12908
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    Quote Originally Posted by saberopus View Post
    Time to create an IMDB page, Reid.
    **** yes, this is going on my resume.

  29. #12909
    Doesn't care what his title is
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    I knew a guy who had "Undrafted Free Agent Quarterback" on his resume for a while. Unsurprisingly, he found himself unemployed for long periods of time.

  30. #12910
    Man, I'm only a few paragraphs into reading this article, but this is very interesting stuff. A $50 million private penthouse in the Moscow Trump Tower for Vladimir Putin in the months leading up to the election, and then covered up? Oh man.

  31. #12911
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    I'll just batter my way past this opening sentence

    President Trump could be forgiven if he feels like the walls are closing in on him.
    which I have read in countless forms over the last 18 months, in order to get to the article.

  32. #12912
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    What an obnoxious statement. Of course Trump canít be forgiven.

  33. #12913
    build a wall and make Bob Mueller pay for it

  34. #12914
    If I am reading this FT article correctly, Donald Trump may soon be indicted:

    Quote Originally Posted by FT
    Edward Luce

    Merely for having sat calmly through George H.W. Bush’s funeral on Wednesday, Donald Trump was hailed by some as having turned a more presidential page. Alas, it was another Groundhog Day in a loop of Trumpian false dawns. Since then, Mr Trump announced the exit of his chief of staff, John Kelly, appointed Heather Nauert, a former Fox News talking head, to be the next UN ambassador, named a new attorney-general, William Barr, and was effectively labelled a criminal by his own Department of Justice. For good measure, he also called Rex Tillerson, his former secretary of state, “dumb as a rock” and “lazy as hell”.

    Mr Trump is battening down the hatches for the second half of his presidential term. It promises to be much stormier than the first. Robert Mueller, the special counsel, is methodically lining up his targets for what increasingly looks like a recommended indictment of Mr Trump for more than one federal crime. On Friday, “individual #1”, as Mr Trump is called in the filings, was implicated in a federal crime in the sentencing reports for Michael Cohen, his estranged personal lawyer, and Paul Manafort, his former campaign chairman.

    The filings were heavily redacted. But even from what was visible, they establish connections between the Russian government and people around Mr Trump from as early as November 2015 — eight months before he took the Republican nomination. The chess grandmaster, Garry Kasparov, once said that Mr Trump “had more Russia connections than Aeroflot”. Mr Mueller has by no means finished mapping them out. “Individual #1” also directed Mr Cohen to break federal election laws in the payment of hush money to two women.

    The looming denouement of Mr Mueller’s investigations coincide with the Democratic takeover of the US House of Representatives, which formally starts in early January. Mr Trump remains fixated before then on securing funding for his border wall. But the walls closing in on his presidency are more tangible than the one on the Mexican border. Nancy Pelosi, the likely next Speaker, will find it very hard to avoid moves towards impeachment given the volume of potential felonies Mr Mueller is amassing. Either way, she will move to subpoena Mr Trump’s tax records, which is likely to trigger a battle in the Supreme Court, back hearings into Mr Trump’s alleged breaking of the US constitution’s emoluments clause, investigate the Trump Organisation’s alleged Russian money laundering, and could back moves to haul up the president’s family, including his two sons, Eric and Donald Junior, and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, to testify.

    Mr Trump clearly senses what is in store. On Friday, the Democratic senator, Richard Blumenthal, told a cable news channel that “the pieces of the mosaic or the puzzle are coming into place.” Mr Trump responded on Twitter by calling the senator “the dick”. He also announced that he had been cleared by Mr Mueller’s latest filings while also repeating his call for the “witch hunt” to be closed down. Mr Barr, his new attorney-general, takes a robust view of executive privilege and a dim view of the powers of special counsels. Unlike Jeff Sessions, his fired predecessor, Mr Barr will probably not be forced to recuse himself from overseeing the Russia investigation. In other words, the walls are also closing in on Mr Mueller.

    Meanwhile, Mr Kelly, the outgoing chief of staff, will leave a White House in disarray. The four-star general has plenty of critics — not least for having robustly supported Mr Trump’s militarisation of the US-Mexico border and incarceration of undocumented children. But he did try to impose some semblance of order on Mr Trump’s routine. His success was questionable. In the book, Fear, by Robert Woodward, earlier this year, Mr Kelly is quoted as calling Mr Trump “an idiot.” He continued: “It’s pointless to try to convince him of anything…….We’re in crazytown. I don’t even know why any of us are here.” Mr Trump’s answer is that the role of White House staff should be to protect him — even when he refuses to take advice. The question is whether it is now too late for such advice to make much difference.

    Edward.Luce@ft.com
    And would you look at these recent tweets--yes, I know it's Twitter, but even by Twitter standards, his writing has become almost totally incoherent.
    Last edited by Reverend Jones; 12-08-2018 at 08:58 PM.

  35. #12915
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    We can only hope.

    If he is impeached and convicted, how long before every Republican changes to "I never supported Trump"?

  36. #12916
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    Last edited by Reid; 12-09-2018 at 01:28 PM.

  37. #12917
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    Hey look Steven, you were right

  38. #12918
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    https://old.reddit.com/r/The_Donald/...m4pj/the_left/

    Apparently they think the French protests are theirs???

    There's no limit for the stupidity of Trump supporters, is there?

  39. #12919
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    [–]nurayn 21 points an hour ago

    Most leftists that I've seen posting about it are supporting the protestors cause they're mostly working class people. They also see the disproportionate force being used as evidence of police brutality and the extent to which a capitalist government will defend its power.

    Liberals may oppose these protestors but leftists do not. The left does not support Macron, who is a centrist at best, and more accurately a neoliberal.

    permalinkembedsaveparentreportgive awardreply

    [–]northface39 19 points an hour ago

    That's precisely why the media won't cover this. The protest is against neoliberalism, and there are people from the left and the right there. It would be as if Hillary were elected president and Trump and Bernie supporters joined forces to protest against her. It's the neoliberal's nightmare.

    permalinkembedsaveparentreportgive awardreply
    A rare moment of lucidity on r/the_donald.

  40. #12920
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    Oops I mean, **** those leftist globalists

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