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Thread: Is this man crazy?

  1. #1

    Is this man crazy?

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    Should I not read his book?

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  2. #2
    Looks like Simon Pegg
    TAKES HINTS JUST FINE, STILL DOESN'T CARE

  3. #3
    This book/man is incessantly quoted in the contemporary occult community as scientific fact (by Chaos Magician types such as Grant Morrison) which is really irritating. As usual, I am more interested in the people involved having crazy experiences. Check this article out:

    http://nautil.us/issue/54/the-unspok...ed-speaking-rp

    and decide for yourself I guess

    That said, I definitely experience my mind as a conglomeration of distinct parts rather than the unified 'self' when I am having what I would call success with meditation or drugs. Can't say it seems like a left side right side thing though.
    sniff

  4. #4
    From what little I understand of it, I think I would be pretty skeptical of the hypothesis, which I imagine one ought to be, at least on the face of it. Basically, Jaynes thought that early humans didn't experience consciousness the way modern humans do, and that we only began to as soon as the left and right halves of the brain began talking to one another.

    I didn't have a chance to read the article you linked to yet, but the idea of modern science hinting that this might be the case seems a little startling. Not out of the question, but since the thesis seems pretty far out there, I suppose the book might be worth reading after all.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend Jones View Post
    From what little I understand of it, I think I would be pretty skeptical of the hypothesis, which I imagine one ought to be, at least on the face of it. Basically, Jaynes thought that early humans didn't experience consciousness the way modern humans do, and that we only began to as soon as the left and right halves of the brain began talking to one another.

    I didn't have a chance to read the article you linked to yet, but the idea of modern science hinting that this might be the case seems a little startling. Not out of the question, but since the thesis seems pretty far out there, I suppose the book might be worth reading after all.
    I dont think that is what the article is hinting.
    sniff

  6. #6
    Oh. I see that now. I'm still interested, of course.

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