View Poll Results: What do

Voters
9. You may not vote on this poll
  • Transport sick smelly people

    0 0%
  • Go to graduate school for no specific career goal

    2 22.22%
  • Ban FGR

    5 55.56%
  • Kill Joncey and autopsy him for science

    2 22.22%
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Results 41 to 50 of 50

Thread: Decide my future

  1. #41
    That said,

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post
    If you're complaining about believing your own ideas that you successfully argued to yourself, I'm struggling to understand what you think a more appropriate standard for accepting an idea should be. Does it only count if someone else convinces you? Where do you think original ideas come from?

    I'm not asking this as part of some epistemological debate, I mean from a purely pragmatic standpoint. You've justified your own belief based on information you believe true. That doesn't mean you're right, but this is quite literally as close to the Platonic ideal of knowledge you can possibly get. How isn't that good enough? I don't even have the words
    ...at least in college writing classes with essay assignments, I DO remember developing more than a few highly speculative (but probably somewhat dubious in retrospect) theses in my essays. I dunno, it made me more creative and a better writer, but later I became more sympathetic to the attitude that to make writing really good, research of the relevant facts trumps artistic flair and brilliant introspection.

    The thing about studying fiction and then writing about it is that you just don't have a way other than introspection to try to divine what the author is trying to do, so imaginations run wild.

  2. #42
    Funny enough, the habit of introspection *did* lead me to a very 'Platonic' view of reality, since it really was the introspection I learned to love in English class that made me fall in love with (fittingly) mathematics:

    Quote Originally Posted by G.C. Rota
    Of all escapes from reality, Mathematics is the most successful ever. It is a fantasy that becomes all the more addictive because it works back to improve the same reality we are trying to evade. All other escapes — sex, drugs, hobbies, whatever — are ephemeral by comparison. The mathematician’s feeling of triumph, as he/she forces the world to obey the laws his/her imagination has created feeds on its own success. The world is permanently changed by the workings of his/her mind, and the certainty that his/her creations will endure renews his/her confidence as no other pursuit. The mathematician becomes totally committed, a monster like Nabokov's chess player, who eventually sees all life as subordinate to the game of chess.
    Last edited by Reverend Jones; 01-19-2019 at 01:27 PM. Reason: Originally left out the last/best part of that quote

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Nikumubeki View Post
    At school they taught me how to cleave
    Subtract and optimize geometry
    They didn't rebuild BSP

    For everything I long to do (a)
    no matter when or where or who (a?)
    has one thing in common too

    It’s a, it’s a, it’s a, it’s TODOA
    *SOLO*
    Man, I would have done way better in high school if they had given me credit for learning to cleave.

  4. #44

    NIKVMVS-REX-TODOA

    Posts
    16,659
    I still like the time Ruthven removed all references to JK from his CV since they were A) useless and B) possibly detrimental.

    (Similarly, many of the contributors to DXN removed all references to it from their CVs and similar documents either right after its release or some time later)

    (I mean, it's perfectly understandable why they did that, but they shouldn't have made a mention of it in the first place, IMO /_\)
    Last edited by Nikumubeki; 01-19-2019 at 02:16 PM.

  5. #45
    ^^vv<><>BASTART
    Posts
    8,029
    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend Jones View Post
    Funny enough, the habit of introspection *did* lead me to a very 'Platonic' view of reality, since it really was the introspection I learned to love in English class that made me fall in love with (fittingly) mathematics:
    Write your autobiography

  6. #46
    ISBN-10: 1585426784

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon`C View Post
    Sorry for giving a real answer and not helping you with your interpretive dance or whatever spook
    I am very interested in everything you just said, but I am applying to a humanities program so I'm going to have to figure out how to ask if securitization of interpretive dance increases complexity. Perhaps if we could automate this by tokenizing it on a blockchain we can simplify things.
    sniff

  8. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend Jones View Post
    ISBN-10: 1585426784
    oh my god how did i miss your name for so long
    sniff

  9. #49
    Admiral of Awesome
    Posts
    17,165
    Quote Originally Posted by Spook View Post
    I am very interested in everything you just said, but I am applying to a humanities program so I'm going to have to figure out how to ask if securitization of interpretive dance increases complexity. Perhaps if we could automate this by tokenizing it on a blockchain we can simplify things.
    Anything that takes massive amounts of electricity and a global supply chain of magical thinking rocks is definitely simpler than a paper ledger

  10. #50
    I think you're right, this will definitely be my paper.
    sniff

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